… a travel photography blog

Posts tagged “yurt

The Mongolian Yurt: Ger Sweet Ger

Recently, I re-discovered my 2010 Mongolia trip photos while searching my archives for images to submit to stock agencies. I’m now motivated to publish a few more blog posts about this intriguing country.

The traditional portable home for nomadic herders roaming the vast grassy steppes of Mongolia is the yurt, or ger as it’s called in Mongolian which literally means home.

Ger pepper the landscape throughout Mongolia and today between 30-40% of the country’s population (Source: Wikipedia) live in a ger, not only on the steppe but many in city suburbs.

Due to the nomadic nature of its occupants, a ger is designed to be dismantled easily and moved, so construction only takes about 2 hours.

A collapsible wooden lattice wall with a door frame supports long, roof poles and a circular crown leaving an opening for the central chimney. The entire framework is covered with layers of wool felt for warmth then ropes secure waterproof canvas over the top.

These photos show the stages of ger construction: the bare skeleton of wall lattice and roof poles, the entire framework covered in layers of felt, and the completed ger with the outer cover of waterproof canvas.

Contructing a Mongolian ger. Wooden wall lattice, roof poles and door. Khutag Ondor, Central Mongolia

Constructing a ger. Wooden wall lattice, roof poles and door.

Contructing a Mongolian ger. Layers of wool felt cover the framework. Khutag Ondor, Central Mongolia

Layers of wool felt cover the framework.

Fully constructed Mongolian ger alongside partly constructed ger. Khutag Ondor, Central Mongolia

Fully constructed Mongolian ger covered in waterproof canvas and secured with ropes alongside partly constructed ger.


A Mongolian National Park: Turtle Rock, Landscapes and a Camel

During our short stay in Gorkhi-Terelj National Park, not far from the Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar, we visited Turtle Rock, named for its resemblance to a turtle when viewed from a certain angle. Known locally as Melkhi Khad, this giant rock formation is a popular spot for visitors to the area.

Here are some photos I shot of scenes around Turtle Rock and the surrounding landscape.

Turtle Rock Melkhi Khad Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia

1. View of Turtle Rock

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Sheep Old Hut Landscape

2. Sheep and goats grazing near Turtle Rock

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Sheep Old Hut

3. Goats and sheep lick the walls of this derelict hut

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Horse Riders

4. Two riders on a horse. A common sight in Mongolia

Turtle Rock Melkhi Khad Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Old Hut

5. Another view of Turtle Rock

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Sheep Landscape

6. Landscape near Turtle Rock

Turtle Rock Melkhi Khad Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Family Friends

7. Group shot of family and friends in front of Turtle Rock. My older brother Matt is far left and younger brother Mike far right.

Turtle Rock Melkhi Khad Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Family Friends Close Up

8. My younger brother Mike (left) and friends Andy, Mark and Kerry from England

Some shots of a friendly camel for hire near Turtle Rock

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Camel 1

9. My new sister-in-law Anna petting a camel near Turtle Rock

Close ups of the friendly camel

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Camel 2

10.

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Camel 3

11.

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Camel 4

12.

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Camel 5

13.

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Camel 6

14.

Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Camel Saddle

15. Close up of the camel's saddle

Turtle Rock Melkhi Khad Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Ger Camp

16. Ger camp near Turtle Rock

Turtle Rock Melkhi Khad Gorkhi Terelj National Park Mongolia Horses

17. Horses and riders hang out near Turtle Rock

Also check out my series on Mike and Anna’s weddingMongolian contortionists and other posts about Mongolia.


A Mongolian Ger Camp: Terelj Lodge

Mongolian ger camps are like campsites with gers instead of tents and the quality of amenities vary from camp to camp. Both local and foreign tourists visit them for a night or a few days.

After my younger brother Mike’s wedding in Ulaanbaatar, family and friends, a mixed Anglo/Mongolian group, all piled into vehicles and headed out of the capital to Gorkhi-Terelj National Park for a couple of days relaxation together.

We stayed at the serene Terelj Lodge 55 km northeast of the city. This was the first time that some of us, including my older brother Matt and our friends from England (all still in our first week in Mongolia) had stayed in a ger and was an experience we’d all been looking forward to. It was the most upscale of any ger camp I stayed at during my travels in Mongolia.

After relaxing, walking and eating lunch we all headed to a few local sights including Turtle Rock (Melkhi Khad) and the Aryapala Initiation and Meditation Centre which I’ll post about next. Later we returned to the ger camp for dinner and at night we sat around chatting while some downed beer or the traditional Mongolian shots of vodka.

Following are a few images of the ger camp.

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Sign

1. Entering Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia View Of Gers

2. View of the ger camp with my younger brother Mike walking towards me

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Gers

3. Close up of gers

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia View Of Interior

4. Looking inside a ger

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Interior Of Ger

5. Typical layout of a ger with woodburning stove, painted table and stools in the center and painted beds around them

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Painted Bed

6. Close up of paintwork on a bed

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Painted Tono

7. Close up of typical painted wooden roof framework inside a ger. The circular "tono" in the roof allows light in and an exit for the stove pipe

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Painted Door

8. Weathered paintwork on outside of ger door

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Painted Stool

9. Close up of painted stool

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Animal Hide View Of Gers

10. View of ger camp and a hide hanging to dry

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Lone Ger

11. View in another direction with a lone ger

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Close up Gers Exterior And Cow

12. Inquisitive cow outside gers in early morning light

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Close Up Ger Exterior

13. Our ger

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Gers Restaurant

14. Path leading to the restaurant

Terelj Lodge Tourist Ger Camp Gorkhi-Terelj National Park Mongolia Gers Exterior

15. Final early morning image as we left the ger camp


Ulaanbaatar Suburbia: Apartment Blocks, Houses and Gers

Suburbia in Mongolia’s capital Ulaanbaatar is like no other. Bleak Russian-style apartment blocks give way to a patchwork of modern, red brick, matchbox-like houses.

Tidy lines of vivid crimson, azure and jade roofs contrast starkly against the chalky curves of Mongolian traditional gers. Intermingling, they compete for space tucked away behind wooden and rusty tin fences splashed with painted symbols.

Driving out of the city, I captured a few images from the window of our moving van.

1. Russian-style apartment blocks

2. More Russian-style apartment blocks

3. Not sure who this graffiti was aimed at. Hopefully not photographers!

4. Houses hidden behind painted fences

5. Painted symbols on fences

6. Rusty tin fences

7. Jumble of gers and brick houses

8. Patchwork of colored roofs and gers

9. A giant gas pipe frames gers further out of the city

10. A lone ger against cityscape and backdrop of hills

11. Crimson roofs stain the landscape

My other Mongolia posts include my brother’s Mongolian wedding, Nadaam festival and Mongolian contortionists.


Getting Hitched in Mongolia – A Temple, a Ger and a Buddha

After leaving the Wedding Palace the entire party went on a tour of the city’s main tourist sights starting with Choijin Lama Temple Museum just around the corner.

Entrance to Choijin Lama Temple Museum.

Anna in front of a ger temple souvenir store.

Kissing outside the temple.

Anna and her niece.

Mike with Anna’s niece.

Old and new.

Mike and Anna kissing again!

Inside the temple.

Inside the temple.

Anna’s cousin and niece.

English friends Kerry, Andy and Mark.

My older brother Matt and my younger brother Mike.

Matt, Kerry, Andy and Mark.

Anna.


Visiting buddha.

Close-up of buddha.

Anna.

Wedding car.

In Sukhbaatar Square.

Mike and Anna in Sukhbaatar Square.

In the car.