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Posts tagged “countryside

Khao Sok National Park: Cheow Lan Lake

Dramatic limestone karsts draped in vegetation and shores blanketed in pristine rainforest, the largest area of virgin forest in Southern Thailand, surround Cheow Lan Lake in the heart of Khao Sok National Park.

Tiny, lush islands once mountain peaks, rise out of tepid, emerald-green waters where water temperatures range between 27°C to 29 °C.

Wildlife in the national park includes Asian elephant, tiger, tapir and bear. A cacophony of jungle sounds fill the air: monkeys and gibbons chatter and howl; hornbills and other exotic birds cry and whistle; and a myriad of insects whine and shrill.

In 1982, Ratchaprapha Dam was built as a source of electricity by blocking off the Klong Saeng River and creating an artificial, 165 square kilometer lake.

Cheow Lan Lake is a popular destination for local and foreign tourists, accommodation provided by rustic, floating raft houses. Activities include trekking to view points, waterfalls and caves; fishing and kayaking; and boat safaris to glimpse wildlife and view the stunning scenery.

We stayed at Prai Wan raft houses, simple bamboo huts floating on the water. We opted for a private tour, that was well worth the money! It included: a knowledgeable and enthusiastic, English-speaking guide; wildlife safaris and cave trip by long-tail boat; hiking through rainforest to a spectacular viewpoint; kayak use and meals.

Here is just a handful from the hundreds of photos I took during our two-night stay. I plan to return to Cheow Lan Lake and to also explore other parts of Khao Sok National Park.

Lakeside raft houses, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Prai Wan raft houses, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Lakeside raft houses & long tail boat, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Long tail boat and Prai Wan raft houses, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Lakeside raft houses & long tail boat, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Long tail boats at Prai Wan raft houses, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Boatman waiting for passengers, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Our boatman waiting for us at a cave, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Giant Rock, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Giant Rock, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Lush island, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Lush island on Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Green island, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Tiny, green island on Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

View of Cheow Lan Lake from viewpoint, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

View of Cheow Lan Lake from viewpoint, Khao Sok National Park

Colors of dusk, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Colors of dusk on Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Boat trip at dusk, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Our guide & boatman on a boat safari at dusk on Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Colors of dusk, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Colors of dusk on Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Skeleton trees in water at dusk, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Skeleton trees in water at dusk on Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park

Sunrise Colors On Lake, Cheow Lan Lake, Khao Sok National Park, southern Thailand

Sunrise Colors on Cheow Lan Lake from Prai Wan raft houses, Khao Sok National Park


The Mongolian Yurt: Ger Sweet Ger

Recently, I re-discovered my 2010 Mongolia trip photos while searching my archives for images to submit to stock agencies. I’m now motivated to publish a few more blog posts about this intriguing country.

The traditional portable home for nomadic herders roaming the vast grassy steppes of Mongolia is the yurt, or ger as it’s called in Mongolian which literally means home.

Ger pepper the landscape throughout Mongolia and today between 30-40% of the country’s population (Source: Wikipedia) live in a ger, not only on the steppe but many in city suburbs.

Due to the nomadic nature of its occupants, a ger is designed to be dismantled easily and moved, so construction only takes about 2 hours.

A collapsible wooden lattice wall with a door frame supports long, roof poles and a circular crown leaving an opening for the central chimney. The entire framework is covered with layers of wool felt for warmth then ropes secure waterproof canvas over the top.

These photos show the stages of ger construction: the bare skeleton of wall lattice and roof poles, the entire framework covered in layers of felt, and the completed ger with the outer cover of waterproof canvas.

Contructing a Mongolian ger. Wooden wall lattice, roof poles and door. Khutag Ondor, Central Mongolia

Constructing a ger. Wooden wall lattice, roof poles and door.

Contructing a Mongolian ger. Layers of wool felt cover the framework. Khutag Ondor, Central Mongolia

Layers of wool felt cover the framework.

Fully constructed Mongolian ger alongside partly constructed ger. Khutag Ondor, Central Mongolia

Fully constructed Mongolian ger covered in waterproof canvas and secured with ropes alongside partly constructed ger.