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Posts tagged “food

Thailand’s Sweet Tooth: Decadent Desserts

Thais have a sweet tooth and a heavy hand with sugar in much of their cuisine but especially, as in any culture, in desserts and candies.

Following on from my post Thai Street Food: Tasting a Kingdom Stall By Stall here are a few popular Thai desserts.

Sadly, I don’t yet have a photo of my personal favorite, mango with sticky rice slathered in coconut milk and sprinkled with sesame seeds. It’s always gone before my camera comes out!

Banana roti with condensed milk and sugar, iced coffee and Chinese tea at a roadside eatery, desserts, Thailand

Banana roti with condensed milk and sugar, iced coffee and Chinese tea at a roadside eatery

Making roti on a street cart, desserts, Thailand

Making roti on a street cart

Folding a roti, desserts, Thailand

Folding a roti

Ready to eat! Banana roti drizzled with chocolate sauce, sliced and served on paper with wooden sticks to eat, desserts, Thailand

Ready to eat! Banana roti drizzled with chocolate sauce, sliced and served on paper with wooden sticks to eat

Selling kanom beu ung at a street stall, desserts, Thailand

Selling kanom beu ung at a street stall

Pieces of bamboo filled with khao lam (a mixture of sticky rice, coconut milk, black beans and taro root) cooking over charcoal at a street stall, desserts, Thailand

Pieces of bamboo filled with khao lam (a mixture of sticky rice, coconut milk, black beans and taro root) cooking over charcoal at a street stall

Kanom beu ung waiting for buyers at a street stall, desserts, Thailand

Kanom beu ung waiting for buyers at a street stall

Kanom pan ping (toasted bread drenched with condensed milk and sprinkled with sugar), iced coffee, and Chinese tea at a night stall, desserts, Thailand

Kanom pan ping (toasted bread drenched with condensed milk and sprinkled with sugar), iced coffee, and Chinese tea at a night stall


Christmas Spirit – Tamales and Ponche

At midnight on the 24th of December Guatemalans typically munch on tamales washed down with steaming homemade fruit punch or ponche.

Cooking tamales the traditional way on an open fire.

 

Serving ponche at a street stall.

 

Tamal colorado

The tamal colorado is one of the most common tamales in Guatemala and although usually sold only on Saturdays it is also the traditional dish for Christmas Eve.

Made from a cooked maize dough or masa with a tomato-based sauce and a piece of pork, chicken or turkey inside, it is served wrapped up in banana leaves.

Throughout the year they are eaten with pan francés (French bread rolls) and a cup of coffee or hot chocolate. However on this day it is more common to accompany them with festive ponche.

The first few times I tried tamales colorados they didn´t grab my attention. It wasn’t until I sampled a number of them that I found some I liked, so it is worth trying a few from different places as the quality can vary greatly.

 

Pache

A variation of the tamal is the pache which is made with a potato dough instead of maize. This year on Christmas Eve I ate tamales colorados in two homes and a pache in a third.

 

Ponche

Ponche is a traditional hot fruit punch drunk at home and sold at food stalls and in restaurants all through the Christmas season and at New Year in Guatemala.

Fresh and dried fruits, usually with a variant of pineapple, oranges, apples, plums, papaya, plantain, raisins and prunes, are placed in boiling water with sugar and cinnamon then simmered.

On Christmas Eve, friends offered me ponche in the four different homes I visited and each one was delicious but very different in flavor. One had coconut added and another had chamomile fruit (manzanillas).

 

 

Peeling chamomile fruit (manzanillas) for ponche.


All Saints Day – Feasting on Fiambre

Only once a year, on El Día de Todos Los Santos or All Saints Day on first of November, Guatemalans prepare a traditional dish called fiambre. Originally, families took the favorite dishes of deceased relatives to the cemetery and ate them together with other families. Eventually they mixed all the ingredients of the various dishes together into one to create fiambre. Served chilled this psychedelic salad consists of a huge number of ingredients that vary greatly from family to family.

The recipe passes down through the generations and consists of a strange mix of different cold cuts and sausages, varied cheeses, hard-boiled egg, smoked fish, and an array of vegetables.

The contrasts of flavors and textures don’t agree with everyone’s taste buds but the beauty of it is that you can add or leave out any ingredient.