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Posts tagged “wedding

Getting Hitched in Mongolia – Facing Chinggis Khaan

One of the stops on our wedding party city tour was the Sukhbaatar Square named after Damdin Sukhbaatar who led the Mongolians to independence from the Chinese in the 1921 revolution.

Walking across Sukhbaatar Square. My older brother Matt is on the left.

Here Mike and Anna came face to face with the immense bronze statue of Chinggis Khaan (pronounced Chinggis Han in Mongolia and known as Genghis Khaan in the West) commanding a view of the square from the top of the steps of Government House.

Government House.


Chinggis Khan statue.

Chinggis Khan united many of the nomadic tribes of northeast Asia, founded the Mongol Empire and conquered most of Eurasia in the 1100 and 1200s. Nowadays this Mongol warlord is a source of great national pride. They have written songs about him, named hotels, restaurants and the international airport after him and his image appears everywhere from money to vodka and beer bottles.

Going to meet Chinggis Khaan. They rope off the area in front of Government house and only Mike, Anna and the photographer climbed the steps.

Stopped by security.

The security guard stopped the photographer. This statue of Chinggis Khaan is so important that they only allow newly weds on their wedding day to mount the stairs and approach it.

The photographer waits while Mike and Anna stand in front of the statue showing the scale of it.

Everyone is happy but especially Mike. He has a strong interest in Chinggis Khaan and made a documentary about the search for this great leader’s tomb.

The descent to the waiting wedding guests.

English friends Kerry, Mark and Andy and my older brother Matt with Chinggis Khaan peering out between their heads.


Getting Hitched in Mongolia – A Temple, a Ger and a Buddha

After leaving the Wedding Palace the entire party went on a tour of the city’s main tourist sights starting with Choijin Lama Temple Museum just around the corner.

Entrance to Choijin Lama Temple Museum.

Anna in front of a ger temple souvenir store.

Kissing outside the temple.

Anna and her niece.

Mike with Anna’s niece.

Old and new.

Mike and Anna kissing again!

Inside the temple.

Inside the temple.

Anna’s cousin and niece.

English friends Kerry, Andy and Mark.

My older brother Matt and my younger brother Mike.

Matt, Kerry, Andy and Mark.

Anna.


Visiting buddha.

Close-up of buddha.

Anna.

Wedding car.

In Sukhbaatar Square.

Mike and Anna in Sukhbaatar Square.

In the car.


Getting Hitched in Mongolia – A taste of Tradition

After the two ceremonies we had a photo shoot in the Wedding Palace then piled into the cars to go just around the corner to a temple for more photos.

Wedding Palace Photo Shoot

The happy couple.

Close-up.

Mike’s Mongolian wedding ring depicting the male symbol.

Mike and Anna leapt at the opportunity to dress up in traditional Mongolian costumes for the photos.


With Anna’s parents.

With Anna’s sisters, nieces, cousins and brother-in-law.

Anna’s oldest niece Deglii.

Anna’s youngest nieces.


Anna’s sister Boroo and her daughters.


Getting Hitched in Mongolia – Local Flavor

After the official service we all followed the bride and groom out to another room for the traditional ceremony. This part was totally unexpected.

Traditional Mongolian Ceremony

Preparing for the traditional Mongolian ceremony.

Anna lighting the fire, signifying the first fire of their marriage.

Everyone chanted and moved their hands in a circular clock-wise direction.

Preparing to give the cup of milk tea to Anna’s father.

Anna’s father with the milk tea.

Anna’s father taking a sip of the milk tea before handing it ceremoniously to Mike.

Mike taking a sip of the milk tea.

Mike offering Anna a sip from the cup.

All the guests now have small cups filled with neat vodka.

Offering Mike a cup of vodka.

Then offering Anna her cup of vodka.

Ready for the toast.

Listening to the toast. Of course the foreigners in the group didn’t understand anything except for Mike who is learning Mongolian. At 11.00 am it was a bit early to down shots of vodka, especially cups of it. Culturally it’s considered polite to accept the cup then take a sip or just a sniff of it before passing it back to the host.

The musician played the morin khuur or horse-head fiddle during the entire length of the ceremony. This is one of the most important traditional musical instruments of the country. The strings are made from horse-tail hair and the top of the neck is carved into the shape of a horse’s head. Empty vodka cups litter the trays on the table in front of him.

At the end of the ceremony after the vodka toast.

Clearing up the empty vodka cups.


Getting Hitched in Mongolia – Tying the Knot

When we entered the Wedding Palace I had no idea that there would be two ceremonies. Firstly the official tying of the knot, plush western registry office style, then a traditional Mongolian ceremony.

Official Wedding Service

The only foreigners at the wedding except for my brothers and me. Anja (left), a Cirque du Soleil performer, flew in from Las Vegas. Mark, Kerry and Andy are all friends from England.

Inside the Wedding Palace just before the ceremony starts.

Listening to their vows in Mongolian which Anna translated to Mike. A few words directed at Mike were in English but the lady’s accent was so thick it was hard to recognize she was speaking English. I understood only a few words from the ceremony.

The bride’s family and friends stood on one side of the room and the groom’s on the other. As there were so few of us on Mike’s side, some of Anna’s family and friends stood with us. Not many could make the long trip from England and Las Vegas to Mongolia. Matt my older brother and best man stands on the far right.

The registrar.


Mike putting on Anna’s wedding ring.

Anna has two wedding rings. On her left hand is the western style ring and on her right hand a traditional Mongolian ring. Her parents presented both of them with rings on the morning of their wedding. Anna’s has the female symbol and Mike’s the male symbol.


Anna putting on Mike’s wedding ring.

Kissing the bride.

Anna signing the register.

Matt my older brother and the best man signing the register. The matron of honor was Anna’s aunt.

The registrar presents the couple with their wedding certificate and a replica of the Wedding Palace.

Anna’s niece giving the couple a bouquet of flowers

After family and friends had presented them with bouquets of flowers.

The knot is tied and the ceremony is complete.


Getting Hitched in Mongolia – Run-up

Cirque du Soleil’s mind-blowing show “O” at Bellagio in Las Vegas set the stage for their romance. Once ignited there was no dousing it. An Englishman and a Mongolian. A fire artist and a contortionist.

Mike and Anna in London

Anna hanging out in Trafalgar Square, London

Now that would’ve aroused my interest under any circumstances but this was my brother getting hitched. Location Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia. There’s no way in the world I would’ve missed that wedding.

The following posts are a photo documentary of the day.

The Bride’s Family Apartment – The Morning Before the Wedding

We arrived to collect the bride, Anna. Her parents greeted us with traditional Mongolian milk tea and breakfast while her sisters helped her get ready in the next room. Mike my younger brother is the groom (right) and Matt my older brother is the best man (left).

The bride appears and Anna’s father offers the groom Mongolian milk tea according to tradition. During formal occasions food, tea or vodka is given and received with the right hand extended and the left hand supporting the right elbow. Also they roll down the sleeves first to show respect.

The same cup is then passed around ceremoniously so everyone gets a sip of the milk tea. After receiving the cup each person hands it back to the groom to offer to the next person.

The first shots of the bride and groom together.

Anna’s mother offers her a cup of milk tea.

The bride and groom. Still waiting to leave the family’s apartment.

The bride’s father helps her into the car.

Outside The Wedding Palace

A photo shoot outside the Wedding Palace while waiting for their allotted time. Each couple has half an hour for the ceremony so punctuality is crucial. That day the traffic was worse than usual and we thought we weren’t going to arrive on time but there were still a few minutes spare to take photos.


Various family members pose for photos.

More family photos.

Time for the bride, groom and best man to enter the Wedding Palace.

Anna’s niece.

Anna’s niece watching the preparations to decorate the car.

Some of Anna’s family while waiting to go into the Wedding Palace.

Anna’s uncle posing in traditional Mongolian costume.

Mongolian registration plate on the wedding car. The red symbol on the left is the national emblem or the Soyombo seen everywhere including on the Mongolian flag. It has representations of fire, sun, moon, earth, water and the Taijitu or Yin-Yang symbol.

Family members decorating the wedding car before the ceremony.